Wednesday, September 20, 2017

Suicidal Rohingya ARSA Vs Genocidal Burma Army


BALUKHALI, Bangladesh — Nazir Hossain, the imam of a village in far western Myanmar, gathered the faithful around him after evening prayers last month. In a few hours, more than a dozen Arakan Rohingya Salvation Army (ARSA) fighters from his village would strike a nearby police post with an assortment of handmade weapons. The men needed their cleric’s blessing.

“As imam, I encouraged them never to step back from their mission,” Mr. Hossain recalled of his final words to the ethnic Rohingya militants. “I told them that if they did not fight to the death, the military would come and kill their families, their women and their children.”

They fought — joining an Aug. 25 assault by thousands of the group’s fighters against Myanmar’s security forces — and the retaliation came down anyway. Since then, Myanmar’s troops and vigilante mobs have unleashed a scorched-earth operation on Rohingya populations in northern Rakhine State in Myanmar, sending hundreds of thousands fleeing their homes in a campaign that the United Nations has called ethnic cleansing.

Tuesday, September 19, 2017

Chinese Developers Behind Burma’s Bengali Cleansing?

(Two articles direct from The HRW & The HUFFPOST on 15 & 18 September 2017.)

HRW satelite image of a burning Bengali border village in Maungdaw District.
(Dhaka) – The Burmese military is deliberately burning ethnic Rohingya villages near the Bangladesh border, Human Rights Watch said today. Such acts of arson, after forcing residents to leave their villages, appear central to the Burmese military’s ethnic cleansing campaign against the Rohingya Muslim population in Burma’s Rakhine State.

Human Rights Watch released new satellite imagery and sensory data showing that 62 villages in northern Rakhine State were targeted by arson attacks between August 25 and September 14, 2017. Human Rights Watch identified 35 of these villages with extensive building destruction from very high resolution satellite imagery, and an additional 26 villages that had active fires detected in near-real time with environmental satellite sensors.

“Our field research backs what the satellite imagery has indicated – that the Burmese military is directly responsible for the mass burning of Rohingya villages in northern Rakhine State,” said Phil Robertson, deputy Asia director. “The United Nations and member countries should urgently impose measures on the Burmese government to stop these atrocities and end the forced flight of Rohingya from Burma.”

Monday, September 18, 2017

Bangladesh Detains 2 Burmese Photo-Journalists


Detained Burmese journalists Min Zeya Oo (L) and Khun Lat (R).
The International Federation of Journalists (IFJ) is deeply concerned over the detainment in Bangladesh of two Myanmar photojournalists on charges “impersonation” and providing “false information” and calls on the Bangladeshi authorities for their immediate release and dropping of all charges.

The IFJ joins Myanmar Journalists’ Association (MJA) in also calling for the full engagement of Myanmar’s Ministry of Information and Ministry of Foreign Affairs in negotiating their earliest release.

Award-winning photojournalist Min Zayar Oo and his assistant, Hkun Lat, who work for German magazine GEO, were accused of entering Bangladesh on tourist visas instead of journalist visas, and reporting “fake news” and arrested on September 7.

They have been denied bail and are in detention. The photojournalists face up to seven years in jail if found guilty of violating Bangladesh’s immigration laws. GEO had said its editorial board was deeply concerned about the two journalists' continued detention.

Saturday, September 16, 2017

Biased International Media & UN Lying About Rohingyas


Buddhist children killed by ARSA on Aug-26.
(No foreign media publishes Buddist suffering)
YANGON — Headlines with prominent references to “genocide” and “ethnic cleansing’ in Myanmar make veteran journalist Daw Aye Aye Win uneasy, as she explains she feels international media coverage about what is happening in northern Rakhine State fails to tell the whole story of the crisis.

Currently, the region is reeling from Arakan Rohingya Salvation Army (ARSA) attacks on 30 police outposts on Aug. 25 and subsequent violence affecting civilians. The Myanmar government declared the Muslim militant group a terrorist organization and has since begun “clearance operations” in the area, leading to Buddhist Rakhine, self-identifying Rohingya Muslims and other Rakhine sub-ethnicities to flee their homes.

Some of the nearly 400,000 Muslims fleeing to Bangladesh have accused the army and ethnic Arakanese of killings, rape and torching of their homes, while members of the 30,000 Arakanese and other ethnic groups internally displaced have claimed they sought refuge elsewhere for fear of attacks from Muslims, who are the majority in the area, but a minority in the country.

Burmese Army Sending The Buddhists Back To Homes

(Translated staff article direct from The ARMY CinC OFFICE on 15 September 2017.)

Since the week-long massive clearing operations by Army’s LID-99 and LID-33 had pushed ARSA Bengali Muslim insurgents and their supporters into Bangladesh the whole border area on Burma’s side has returned to peace and tranquillity.

Without dreaded Bengali Muslims always threatening the native Buddhist villages dotted among massive illegal villages of Bengali Muslims from Bangladesh the native Buddhist Yakhine and Burmese refugees are slowly returning to their villages, farms, and fishing grounds now well under the armed-protection of Burmese Army.

Just yesterday a battalion-strong army column from Na-Pa-Kha (Western Military Divisional Command) had escorted altogether 554 native Buddhist villagers taking a temporary refuge in the Taung-Byo-Let-Wel village’s army camp in Muangdaw-North back to their home village.

Friday, September 15, 2017

What Really Is In The Mind Of A Muslim Refugee?


The autumn of 2015 was unusual in almost every way on the north Aegean Greek island of Lesbos from which I am writing. There were tens of thousands of illegal migrants on the island, the native population of which was scarcely 100,000. New refugees arrived every day by the thousands.

One evening, the blue-grey sky grumbled shortly after sunset. The thick clouds blackened and rain poured down over the city with a roar. As I ran across the slippery pavement into a friend's bar, I heard a group of five poor souls speaking Persian with a Turkic accent and running amok, seeking shelter under the eaves of a building.

A quarter of an hour later I found them in front of my friend's bar, totally soaked. I went out and asked them if they spoke English; they shook their heads. I asked them in Turkish if they spoke Turkish. With glittering eyes, three of them cheerfully said, "Evet!" ["Yes" in Turkish]. I told them they could come into the bar if they liked. They hesitated but politely declined. I asked if they needed food, water, or cigarettes.

Thursday, September 14, 2017

Turky’s Fake News Campaign For Rohingya Terrorists


Turkish Deputy PM spearheading the fake news campaign.
Reporting on the Rohingya: “The Tip of a Huge Iceberg of Misinformation”: Aung San Suu Kyi, the leader of Myanmar, is now all over the news, being taken to task for “not speaking out” against the mistreatment of the Rohingya, the Muslim minority in Myanmar, almost all of whom live in the western Rakhine State of Myanmar.

365,000 people have signed a petition demanding she be stripped of her Nobel Prize for not speaking out and denouncing the Buddhists of Myanmar; in Pakistan, a country renowned for its humane treatment of minorities, her photograph has been publicly burned; Al Jazeera has denounced her, and so has that champion of justice Tariq Ramadan.

In the last month, the world media reports, 250,000 Rohingya have now fled the latest cycle of violence, that began with Rohingya attacks on the military in mid-August, for Bangladesh. In fact, Aung San Suu Kyi has spoken out, but not in the way that many expected. They wanted her to categorically denounce the Burmese military and to depict the Rohingya as entirely innocent victims of Buddhist attacks; this she has refused to do.

Wednesday, September 13, 2017

Rohingya Crisis: UN Security Council Briefing


Myanmar: Briefing under “any other business”: Tomorrow morning (13 September), at the request of Sweden and the United Kingdom, Council members will be briefed by Under-Secretary-General for Political Affairs Jeffrey Feltman under “any other business” on the deteriorating situation in Myanmar’s Rakhine state.

It seems that an OCHA (UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs) representative will be present to answer questions. Although the UN Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights has been present at briefings on Myanmar in the past, it appears that its participation in this briefing was not requested.

During the meeting, most Council members are expected to condemn the ongoing violence and emphasise the need for full humanitarian access and the protection of civilians. The importance of a long-term solution may also be stressed. It has been difficult to get any Council agreement on this agenda item over the years, and most members are not anticipating a formal outcome. However, at press time it appeared that there was the possibility of agreement on press elements following the briefing.

Tuesday, September 12, 2017

Oh Oh Oh, Pity The Poor Rohingya Muslims!


Yeah really, folks. Because the poor pitiable Rohingya who settled (illegally) in Burma (Myanmar) can’t rape, rob or kill Buddhists as they desire. That’s really sad, don’t you agree? No respect for different cultures.

As it happens, I live almost around the corner, in Thailand. I’ve been to Burma a couple of times. That doesn’t make me an expert, of course. Real experts are [white] female professors at left-wing universities who teach Female Gender Mutilation or African Arts. Who have never been to the country at all. What happens in Myanmar is about to happen — or happening already — in the West, too.

A little bit of the background for you. British India included Pakistan in the west, India in the middle, Bengal in the east and Burma a bit further to the east. Burma was never formally part of British India, but a separate colony. Bengal and Burma share a long border. In 1948, when India became independent, Bengal became part of Pakistan and was renamed East Pakistan. Burma also became independent.